Tuesday, November 23, 2010

I "Passed" My Mammogram

(continued from "How I Found It")

I received my letter August 10, with the results of the mammogram; 

"your recent mammogram has been interpreted; it shows no features to suggest cancer"...  "Please remember 10% of breast cancers can not be found on breast imaging"...see your doctor for a clinical exam if you haven't already done so."

Look familiar?  If you are over 40, I hope it does.  What does it mean?  You've done your prevention and had your annual mammogram.  It's your "I don't have breast cancer ticket" for another year.  Whew.  

Taa-daa.  See not cancer.  Some type of mid-life change.  Nothing you can do about it.  Deal with it.



Coincidentally, I had an appointment with my primary care physician the week after I received my letter.  I mentioned the discharge to her and the visit to the breast health center.  She said, "it's probably a good idea to go see the surgeon and have it checked out, 90% of the time, it's nothing, but there are some cancers/pre-cancers that don't show up on mammograms".  "It's nothing probably, if you check it out and it happens again, you'll know the cause."   For some reason, her explanation/presentation prompted me follow up.  

Thank you God.

I made an appointment that afternoon.  The surgeon couldn't see me until the next week, but I wasn't really concerned.  I was just covering the bases to "be sure" everything was ok.  During that week, there were some other changes that started happening with that breast, but nothing that would cause me to think I had cancer.  Again, there were no lumps. Probably infection.  I looked it up on the internet.  Could be cancer, but could more likely be many other things.  

I went to a party that weekend with wonderful friends we don't see often enough.  We were catching up and I was lamenting about being a stay at home mom (being a stay at home mom is kind of out of character for me).  I was trying to live in the moment with the kids, but really wanted to be working full time and there wasn't a lot of work to choose from right now.  She said, "relax, maybe the universe is trying to tell you something."  This benign, reassuring comment haunted me for days.  I started to think, "what if it is something serious?" "what if the universe is trying to tell me something?"  "What if the last year was a gift; to be with the kids full time because I wasn't going to be around for all of the other summers?" DRAMA.  Get the drama out of your head.  You're healthy.  You're being mellow-dramatic.  You're not sick.  You've got to get a job.  Really, too much time on your hands.  So, I waited for the appointment and tried not to think about it anymore.


WHAT I ALWAYS TRY TO REMEMBER:
Of course this last year was a gift.  It's all a gift.  Everyday.  Every minute.  Sick or not.  The time you have with friends and family is time limited...you live far away and don't see them much; everyone is busy right now and as soon as _____________(fill in the blank) you'll spend more time with them; if you work with good friends; layoffs happen, transfers happen and careers change;  or they leave the world much sooner than we wanted them too.  I've always tried to remember that, but it does get lost in the craziness of the days.

Be sure to make a point to ENJOY the holidays this year.  Don't stress out over the stuffing, order pizza if you have to.  Make sure you spend time with the people you love.



Tuesday, November 16, 2010

So, How did you find "it"?

Everyone asks.  Well, mostly everyone, especially women.  I don't mind.  "So, how did you find it"?  Always looking very expectantly for me to say yes after the first question, "Self exam?" then the second, "Mammogram?"  I say no on both accounts.  Then, there is usually a pause, a look of confusion and a little fear.  Because, if it wasn't found like it was "suppose" to be, then how are any of us safe from it?  My first response would be to say:
 
YOUR NOT! NONE OF US ARE!  CUT OFF YOUR BOOBS AND RUN FOR YOUR LIFE!  

But, I think that's an overstatement and somewhat reflective of my current mental state.

THE REAL ANSWER:  Know your body.  I mean, know-your-body.  What it looks like.  What it feels like.  What is normal, what is not. When something doesn't feel right, CHECK IT OUT.  Go to the doctor.  If the doctor dismisses your concerns or provides treatment that doesn't clear up the problem GO BACK.  If your think or feel that your concerns are not being addressed or the doctor keeps doing the same treatment with the same results. FIND ANOTHER DOCTOR that listens to you, provides testing or treatment that clearly identifies the problem and/or clears it up.



THE OTHER CRITICAL PIECE: Listen to yourself.  Your inner voice. Put the pieces together, if they don't add up, what needs to happen next?  Second opinion?  Talk to a friend or another professional?  (P.S. Not the friend who want to make you feel better, the one that tells you your butt IS to big in those pants.)  Don't dismiss your concern or fear by allowing yourself to get distracted by all of the busy stuff you have to do.  Because guess what?  It could be something serious. I have met many women in the last few weeks, who didn't listen to their bodies or took the word of someone else, that everything was ok.  Some waited over a year to follow up on concerns and their journey is much more difficult because of it. 

Please know I am not saying that everyone who has metastatic cancer procrastinated and it's their fault.  Cancer is mean and sneaky.  There are many different types that present differently.  There are no guarantees.  But ignoring changes in your body ESPECIALLY your breasts, can cost you dearly.

So, in a nutshell, (ha), here's how I found "it"...

Nipple discharge.  No one ever asks about it.  In July I noticed a small spot (a little smaller than the diameter of a pencil eraser) on the inside of my bra.  I was overdue for my mammogram by about two months, so, I scheduled an appointment.  Over the course of my adult life, (rare, but it did happen) I had occasionally had a small amount of discharge, so I wasn't overly concerned.  I actually thought, it was probably related to some pre-menopausal symptoms or hormonal changes.

I do self breast exams regularly.  I know the terrain very well, and had never found a lump of any kind.  My breasts have always been just regular and boring;  no lumps, no bumps, no family history.  Yey.  

My mammogram was fairly uneventful.  The only exception to this was when they asked if I was having any problems.  "I've had no problems, but I did recently have a small amount of discharge."  (I did not consider this a problem at this point-I thought it was their job to help determine if it was a problem. Right?)

This did stop the presses for a moment.  FYI...when you say "nipple discharge" in a breast health center, it's kind of like saying "bomb" in an airport.  Everyone stops, asks who you've told/seen about this and insists you talk to your Dr. about it. Immediately.

I left the mammogram center and went downstairs to my Dr.'s office.  The nurse said they could refer me to a breast surgeon for follow up.  "Surgeon" seemed a little extreme to me and while nipple discharge seemed to be a big deal, it only happened once and it wasn't very much.  I had talked to several friends about it.  It had happened to almost all of them at one time or another and was usually just an infection. 

I didn't ask the right questions or they didn't give me the right information to make me feel talking to a surgeon was warranted.  I did not listen or pick up on the not so subtle cues regarding nipple discharge. No one said it could be serious or that it could be cancer.  Even if they did, I don't eat meat, I exercise, don't smoke, no birth control,
NEVER-EVEN-BEEN-IN-THE-HOSPITAL.  EVER
Every time a new study comes out about how to lower your risk for breast cancer,  
I don't even try and I fit most of the categories.  HA.  Take that cancer.  I said no thanks.

  





Friday, October 29, 2010

Purpose Driven Day

I haven't read Purpose Driven Life, but today, I did use the title as a catalyst for my day.  I tried to spend most of my energy focusing on Luci, our 4 year old.  She has had the toughest few weeks.  It's hard being 4, almost 5, on a good day.  Throw in a parent incapacitated by major surgery and a brother/best friend/playmate with a broken arm and it really gets challenging.  She crawled in bed with me yesterday and said, "my brother is hurt", "he can't play kings and princesses", "he CAN'T even wrestle or snuggle with me".  Then, she buried her face in my neck/shoulder.

She's been giving my mom a tremendous amount of grief since she's been here helping out.  She tells my mom almost daily, with words or her tone, to leave.  After weeks of reprimand, timeout and talking we finally realized it was more about what my mom represented... a broken parent and lack of normalcy.  Someone is always doing my job because I haven't been able to do it.

So today, just Luci and I, went to Target to get a movie and snacks for family movie night.  She picked everything-movie, snacks and fire logs for a fire.  We rolled the windows down, turned the music up and sang as loud as we could...she picked ALL the songs. (and she's got good taste in music!)  I gave her lots of hugs, randomly all day.  We ate lunch at Target's snack bar and visited some wonderful friends/colleagues at my previous work.  

 
Everyone was all dressed up for Halloween which made it a great treat for her.  She had her picture made with Snow White and saw Jessie the Cowgirl from Toy Story.  She also got a real kick out of PacWoman-for some reason she laughed about it a lot after we left.

So, overall, it was a very boring, regular day--just like old times.  


She didn't complain once.


 

Thursday, October 28, 2010

Guaranteed Recovery

I am continuing to recover, slooooooooowly, but steadily.  I called the Dr.'s office earlier this week to get a "refresher" on what I can do and cannot do.  I'm feeling better and have more energy and stamina, so "resting" is becoming more challenging.  My "can do" list is always a little more limiting than I remembered. 

Our other exiting news is that Elliot broke his arm this weekend.  It was his right arm...and my extra right arm.  He's been so helpful during all of this to lift or open things for me.  That was a set back for both of us!!  He is doing better and will get his "real" cast on Friday, which will provide him a little more comfort and mobility.

My mom has been here during the weeks since my surgery, next week, she is going to stay home.  She is going to call and check in, but we think I can make it on my own.  Yea!!

Today I had my first "fill" with the expander.  It wasn't bad at all.  I dreaded it a little more than I realized, I think.  In the end, it took longer to park the car than to complete the procedure.  I think some of the anxiety came from being on the heels of finishing up several chapters of Dr. Susan Love's Breast Book.  It has a tremendous amount of information in it about breast cancer, treatment and all that comes with your "cancer package" whether you ordered it or not.  It was a bit overwhelming.  Basically, there are no guarantees.  Not a surprise, but scary and disappointing if you're in a position to want a little bit of certainty back in your life.  

     "I may not have control over what happens in my life, but I do have control over my attitude."  Laura's quote of the day.  Just put on a little lipstick

I have met many people who have much greater challenges to resume a life free of Dr. appointments, if its possible at all.  I realize I have many things to be grateful for in all of this; early diagnosis, treatment (or lack thereof), the prognosis, my friends, family, neighbors and medical community that have made a sudden and traumatic event pass with the swiftness and ease I could not have imagined 6 weeks ago.  That has been my focus from the beginning and will continue to be what sustains me.

denise

Top Ten Ways to Make Mastectomy Recovery Fun...

10.  Narcotics!
9.    Good food/new recipes.
8.    Good food/old recipes. 
7.   Spending more time with my mom in the last four weeks than I have in years.
6.   Appreciating the kindness of strangers in this crazy busy time.  (Opening the door for               someone who "looks normal" can really be a big deal and you don't even know it!)
5.   Getting to know new friends.
4.   Hearing from old friends and talking about the "good ole days".
3.   Riding on the city streets with my mom who doesn't like to drive in the city.
2.   Riding in the bike lane with my mom on the way to the doctor's office. (Not on a bike, but         with only two wheels in the lane, so technically, we are legal.)  :)
1.   Realizing the blessings that I've had all along, but didn't have time to see.

Sunday, October 17, 2010

Drain Free and Ready to Drive!!

The drains are out!!  I love freedom!!!  It's so nice to move around without having to make sure you don't get hung up on something because of tubes hanging from your body.  Not to mention the ease of going to the bathroom or changing clothes without having to juggle slow moving body parts with limited range of motion AND dangling tubes. 

The title is somewhat of an overstatement on the driving part.  I did drive Saturday morning, which will probably do it for a while.  There was a lot of discomfort during and after.  Plus, I'm really trying to keep the movement down.  Excessive movement produces fluid, and without the drains, this could cause more discomfort and the need to go back to have the fluid drained.  Who wants that?  NOT ME!

I am walking regularly and building up my stamina. If my progress continues, I think I will be on the shorter end of the predicted recovery time instead of the longer side.  I also have to remember, this is a process that takes months from start to finish. I try to stay focused on today and making sure it goes well before thinking about tomorrow's progress.

With that said, I should probably say WE (including many of you) will be on the shorter end of the predicted recovery time.  I cannot imagine going through something like this without the support, encouragement and ALL of the tangible things that so many of you are doing for our family to make such a crazy situation seem not to out of the ordinary especially for the kids.  They haven't missed soccer practice, play dates or anything AND they have eaten healthy and regularly throughout this whole ordeal.  It a world where, everyone is sooo busy and doesn't have time for any extras in their schedule, the time you have taken to help us through this has been priceless. You are truly a blessing to us.

d



Wednesday, October 13, 2010

The Best Part About Breast Cancer...Finding the Silver Lining with Chocolate Filling

A few days before my surgery,  Luci was asking questions "are you going to die?" "will it hurt?" "how long will you be at the hospital?"  After we talked about what was "scary" about d's cancer, she sat there quietly.  "Do you know the best part about breast cancer?"  "No, what?"  With a big grin, "the DESSERTS!!"  I have to agree with her on that one! 

I am thankful for the desserts (and the healthy food especially), I'm also thankful for many things I will try to appreciate more from now on; the ability to wash my hair or take a bath without assistance, carrying ANYTHING that weighs more than 1 pound without someone making a big deal of it OR even thinking twice about what I have in my hand, opening a window, opening a soft drink by myself, dressing myself, SHAVING under my arms.  That's right.  I haven't shaved in 3 weeks.  What does that mean?  If I hadn't seen the hamsters being buried, I would have sworn they were sleeping under my arms. Gross. 

The medical update info...I'm doing well.  Trying to rest has been a little easier this week as I am really tired.  Just as I have been told (especially by my mother over and over and over) "you can't just have major surgery and get up and walk around".  You can, but it makes you really tired the next few days.

Only 2 Dr.'s appointments this week, hopefully one that will remove the one remaining drain.   There are some issues with blood levels, so I'm being monitored closely for a while.  Let's hope everything is fine in the end...well, I don't me "THE END", I just mean the end of this ordeal.  :)


denise

Thursday, October 7, 2010

Dr.'s, Dr.'s and More Dr.'s

I've never loved rejection so much!!  I met with my oncologist for the first and last time on Tuesday.  Based on my path report, I will not need chemo!! Yey!  She doesn't want to see me again.  :)

I met with the surgeon on Wednesday and don't have to see him again for three months!!  I will be followed/monitored every three months for a couple of years to make sure everything remains "clean".  

I will be visiting the plastic surgeon's office for many weeks to come, but given the choices, I'll take that one!!  I still have a few tubes attached, bandages and stitches, but it's all healing very well. (I'm sure due to all of the heckling I've received regarding "taking it slow".) AND the ability to do so because of your help and great wishes.  When you are incapacitated,  EVERY SINGLE thought and helpful hand is huge.

Look for more good news as soon as I get it!!

d

Tuesday, October 5, 2010

One Week Later...Still Doing Great. Mostly

I've passed the one week mark as of today, somehow that's a good milestone to get past.  Overall, it's been good, with a few "bumps" in the road.  There are several Dr.'s appointments this week to get through.  Hopefully, with good reports, I think this will get me on the "freeway" with much more progress.  BUT I DO REALIZE, I can only go so fast and will not push things too much at once.  (This is to the "caretakers" who feel I don't listen or do a very good job as a patient.)  

I am also getting mixed messages "you need to do this",  "DON'T DO IT TOO MUCH".  "Shouldn't you do this?" NO, NOT THAT"!  It's like the construction guy who holds up the "SLOW" sign when there is one lane traffic, but is waving frantically to you to move on.  That always freaks me out...fast or slow which is it???

Patience isn't something I've grasped very well, but, I'm trying.  The next time you see me, the first thing you might notice/think to yourself is, "my, Denise seems much more patient, calm and focused than she did before".  HA!  Remember, they took my breast, not my brain, so don't go overboard with this.

It's not always great--although overall, so much better than I expected and I'm very lucky that it was caught early.  There is a lot of discomfort, but not really pain.  Ok, there is some pain-but minimal when you consider the procedure.  There have been a few times that I have almost passed out when we are changing the bandages. It's not painful as much as just lost of pressure on my chest, causes me to feel nauseous and light headed.  I have yet to hit the floor, another victory for me and I'm sure Shalene as well. 

Today, I would ask for positive thoughts/prayers regarding the final path report and my visit with the oncologist.  I would also ask that you enjoy a nice hot bath tonight and take a few extra minutes, just for me.  That is my favorite thing...and seems to solve most problems no matter what they might be. A nice, hot bath.   I cannot take long, hot deep baths until I lose the hardware attached to my body and the bandages...so, just knowing everyone else is enjoying it, somehow makes me a winner anyway.  AND kind of gives cancer the finger at the same time.  :)   So, give cancer the finger, enjoy your bath and I'll talk to you soon.

Saturday, October 2, 2010

Slower but still moving forward...

Friday and Saturday have been a little slower in the recovery phase.   There are nerves and muscles that I think are just waking up and making their presence known since the surgery.  I'm a little sore and moving slow.  That said, I am still surprised at how well I'm doing.  I've always been such a weenie when it comes to medication and reactions to anything-my expectations were VERY low regarding what I could do post op.  

Thank you for the calls, visits and the food.  Every little thing makes such a huge difference in our ability to get through the day-especially with the kids.  

I am waking up every 4 hours to take meds, which makes for short nights and long days, especially for Shalene.  I am eating regularly and walking at least once per day ( a little further each day) which I think really helps a lot.  Do's, don't s and lesson's learned from Verna and Laura have really helped me avoid pitfalls as well.

I have two appointments next week:  1.  Final Path Report with Surgeon-this will hopefully confirm everything from surgery.  2. Oncology-based on the pathology report, the Oncologist will recommend treatment options.  So, keep your fingers crossed, thoughts/prayers that it continues to be all good news. 

It's a Great Day for Saying "I Do"

Today Christy Fisher, married her best friend, Wade Perry.  Christy is my step sister and a great friend.  She and Wade have been friends for a long time, went their separate ways and then reconnected two years ago.  They are both wonderful people with kind spirits.  It's the kind of union that you see between two people and say, "yeah, that's what it's all about."
I wasn't able to make the wedding, but have thought of them most of the day.  What a beautiful day to be outside with family and friends and celebrate your love, friendship and future together!  Congratulations Christy and Wade!!

Friday, October 1, 2010

I'm Glad to Be Home!!

Even when you're sick, life goes on, or not so much.  Sam, Elliot's hamster, died the night I was in the hospital.  I don't know who was more traumatized, the kids or Shalene's mom.  (Thank goodness for Kroger on Hwy 100 and the toy supply they keep in stock or Shalene's mom may not have made it through the night!)

Sam was 8 months old and Elliot had taken wonderful care of him, since we got him in February.  Wednesday night when I arrived home,we had a funeral for Sam in the back yard.   It has been a bittersweet week as we remember all of the fun times with Sam and how we will miss him. Thanks especially to Laura, who knew about a Guinea Pig looking for a new home, so, while Sally cannot replace Sam, (as Elliot insists), she will be a good friend.    

On the up side, I am continuing to get better every day.  I have no doubt my recovery has everything to do with the thoughts, prayers and cheers of encouragement from everyone. 

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

I'm Outta Here! 5:10 p.m. I have been released from the hospital. Speedy (yet slow and careful) recovery-here we come!!

Tuesday, September 28, 2010

For an old girl who, until 3 weeks ago, had never been hospitalized, I am doing great.The strength from friendships/prayers is amazing. Morphine also helps :)
The nodes are clear! Denise made it through surgery well and she is in recovery. Thanks to everyone for your support.

And I'm Off....

Here's to steady hands (surgeon), clear nodes and a speedy recovery!!  Thank you everyone for being there for me.

Friday, September 24, 2010

Surgery Info...


"Courage is being scared to death... and saddling up anyway."  ~John Wayne

 Tuesday @ 10 a.m.  Baptist Hospital.   
In keeping with the theme...I thought this was a great symbol of what's to come next week.  What I didn't think about was my neighbor's dad backing out of his driveway when I raised my shirt.  Oh well, irreverence has it's risks.

Thursday, September 23, 2010

The Countdown...

My surgery will be Tuesday, August 28.  I'm am uncertain of the time, but will post it by Friday afternoonThe best outcome Tuesday would be that the lymph node biopsy is negative, so, positive thoughts/prayers for negative nodes!! It is also very close to the chest muscle, but not affecting it based on the MRI.  So, I would like to leave with all of the nodes and muscle I can!

The cards, emails, calls and food have been a godsend.  The childcare for Dr. appointments-priceless.  The thoughts and prayers definitely felt and needed. 

I will be posting updates on the blog, so you can check here for updates.  Phone calls and emails are welcomed, but may not be responded to quickly. 

Many of you have asked what I/we need.  I'm not even sure at this point, but THANKFULLY  have super-duper angel-like friends that are going to take care of coordinating food and other needs.  If you want to get in touch with them, you can email Catherine:  
 catherine.bass@comcast.net

Thank you again for the love, friendship and strength.

denise